HP Enterprise’s Newest Cloud Tactic? Work with Microsoft to Sell Customers on Azure

A. DeCarlo

A. DeCarlo

Summary Bullets:

  • Close on the heels of its decision to shutter its Helion public cloud, HP Enterprise is going the partner route to the hybrid cloud with a new alliance with Microsoft Azure
  • HP Enterprise will now sell customers on Microsoft Azure services while Microsoft will send customers seeking out consulting and private cloud services to HP Enterprise

HP Enterprise CEO Meg Whitman slipped a surprise into the Q4 2015 earnings call, the last quarter in which HP reported as a single company. The company is teaming with long-time ally Microsoft in the cloud. HP Enterprise, which announced last month that it is scrapping its own Helion public cloud services, will now be a preferred Microsoft Azure partner. The company will now sell Microsoft Azure public cloud services while the latter will point clients in need of public cloud and consulting services to HP. Read more of this post

Looking for Wood Among the M2M Trees

Summary Bullets:

  • For CIOs, the hype around M2M is irrelevant to the value they can get from it.
  • If they can cost-justify a use case now, they should just do it; telcos need volume to drive prices even lower.

IoT has struggled to become pervasive because there is a mismatch between the longevity and cost of the communicating device and the application it serves, and the value they create. Since silicon can last forever, the secret is to increase the number of chips and applications in service. So when they talk to their telco suppliers about M2M applications, CIOs need to bear in mind the cost/volume/profit (CVP) relationship, and seek to maximize the value they can create. Read more of this post

Unify’s Free UC Offer Is Good and True, but It May Be Better to Pay

Gary Barton

Gary Barton

Summary Bullets:

  • Unify’s free service offers a valuable taster of UC, but there are other ‘try before you buy’ options.
  • Buyers and providers should both be aware that limitations on a service (e.g., limited integration) may hide the real value of a UC solution.

Unify (newly acquired by Atos) has moved to gain market attention and traction with the offer of free UC services. The free service is limited to only 100 users and provides only 1 gigabyte of storage (for further details, see: Unify Stakes Claim to SME Market, but Might Find Only Fool’s Gold, November 20, 2015). Although it is not without risks, this is a smart move by Unify. It offers a very competitive UC solution via its Circuit platform. However, overshadowed by Cisco and Microsoft and facing the growing popularity of rivals such as BroadSoft and Google Apps, Unify has a significant challenge to gain market attention and traction. Read more of this post

BlackBerry Unveils its Good Technology Integration Strategy: Hurry Up and Wait

Summary Bullets:

• BlackBerry is deliberately choosing a measured pace for its Good integration, eschewing aggressive competitors and patient investors.

• As the future platform combines BES and Good Dynamics, Good for Enterprise customers may find themselves on the outside looking in.

On a call for customers this week, BlackBerry offered a strategic update on its Good Technology acquisition, specifically focusing on the technological synergies between the two product portfolios, and the current and future value proposition for current and new customers. While the event was long on hype and short on technical detail, there were several notable takeaways. Read more of this post

Challenges and Opportunities for the Enterprise Embracing BYOD and Flexible Office Policies

Joel Stradling

Joel Stradling

Summary Bullets:

  • Our research indicates that two-thirds of business use personally owned mobile devices for doing business.
  • Working remotely can have some downsides, such as insufficient bandwidth for running a video or VoIP conference.

There are more and more examples of companies that are open to their employees using their own personal handhelds and whichever apps they might choose to conduct business. This might even be a key criterion for budding new recruits considering which company to join, so the IT department has to adapt and loosen some rules to attract the best flip-flop and shorts-wearing talent. Read more of this post

Have Managed Mobility Services Commoditized or Are They Just Humming Along?

Kathryn Weldon

Kathryn Weldon

Summary Bullets:

  • Having recently completed Current Analysis’ bi-annual update of the top mobile operators’ global managed mobility services, it is clear there is not a lot that is substantially new in this segment.
  • This could mean a number of things: value-added mobility services may be profitably humming along; or they are no longer highlighted, as they have been increasingly integrated with other strategic enterprise services; or – worst case – they are commoditizing and somewhat stagnant service elements.

Current Analysis recently completed its updates of the top global mobile operators’ managed mobility services (MMS) portfolios. Information for some of these reports came from recent analyst events, but ironically, few of these events actually included separate sessions on this segment. The reasons for this varied from operator to operator, but a few issues stand out. Enterprise mobility is no longer a novelty; it is a given that companies of every size and in every region are increasing their use of mobile services on smartphones and tablets for voice and data communications (both internal and external) as well as for public and intra-company information access, navigation, access to databases with the ability to transact key business processes from mobile apps while on the road for functions such as CRM, product inventory, sales enablement, etc. No one denies that the productivity gains of mobility are huge, as fewer employees are tethered to their desks and mobile devices provide capabilities way beyond the old e-mail/PIM apps of yesteryear. Read more of this post

Cloud and Mobility Underpin Future Communications, but Enterprise Requirements and Stakeholder Needs Will Dictate the Migration

Cindy Whelan

Cindy Whelan

Summary Bullets:

  • In determining long term plans for communications and collaboration services, enterprises must not only consider corporate requirements, but also understand how stakeholders want to work.
  • Cloud and mobility are the linchpins of enterprise communications going forward, but providers must be prepared to support on-premise infrastructure and applications that are already in place.

BroadSoft held its Connections event a couple of weeks ago, under the theme “Defining the Future.” During the event, there was a panel about The Future of Work that yielded some interesting perspectives from enterprises regarding the shift to new communications models. The companies were from the hospitality, healthcare, and education verticals, and while all agreed on the need for cloud and mobility, there were different perspectives on how to get to the next level, and some of the challenges they faced. Read more of this post

API Providers Remain Unclear Over Enterprises’ Requirements for API Services

Charlotte Dunlap

Charlotte Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Vendors prioritize API management technologies as part of MADP and PaaS offerings.
  • There are mixed messages over how enterprises will consume API services.

Recently, while at Oracle’s fall conference, I attended a session on the new API economy. The speaker began his presentation by asking how many developers in the audience had begun API projects with the aim of achieving new monetary revenues as a result. Most in the audience raised their hands. He then asked how many would like to have API solutions provided by said vendor, and no one raised their hands, much to his amazement. Read more of this post

Could Vertical Public Clouds Become Reality in Europe?

  • John Marcus

    John Marcus

    Most vertical cloud solutions to date have been industry applications offered as a service

  • Public cloud services dedicated to key verticals could remove some barriers to utility computing adoption

Some vertical cloud service offerings have been around for some time, although not quite as long as horizontal SaaS offerings for applications like CRM. In Europe, there are a handful of consortia and trading platforms ranging from the UK public sector’s G-Cloud to the EU scientific community’s Helix Nebula cloud marketplace, the latter supported by Atos, CGI, CloudSigma, T-Systems and others. In both cases, end user organizations have the choice of a range of providers for a number of defined solutions across IaaS, SaaS, PaaS and value-added services. Individual service providers have well-developed solutions for core verticals – e.g., healthcare, financial trading and e-commerce – but the focus there tends to be on business applications. Read more of this post

What’s Wrong with FireEye? Here’s a Hint: It’s Not China

Summary Bullets:
• FireEye’s CEO is disingenuous in trying to blame reduced cyberattacks by China for its Q3 earnings miss.

• The reality is FireEye is suffering from increased competition, poor public perception and inability to execute.

Threat detection vendor FireEye caused quite a stir in the security and investment communities last week following its third-quarter earnings announcement. Despite record revenue topping $165 million, FireEye missed both revenue and earnings estimates, posting a net loss of $123 million. That in itself isn’t remarkable; companies disappoint Wall Street every day. What caused heads to turn was the intimation by FireEye CEO Dave DeWalt that it fell short because of reduced cyberespionage activity originating from China, what he called “a reduction in the threat landscape,” which in turn reduced business opportunities for FireEye. Read more of this post