OpenWorld: Oracle’s Ellison Makes an Aggressive Play to Dominate the Cloud He Once Dismissed

A. DeCarlo

A. DeCarlo

Summary Bullets:

• Unveiling its second generation IaaS platform at its OpenWorld user conference, Oracle’s Ellison asserted that it is Oracle not AWS that will lead the market

• But the company has a lot of ground to cover to come anywhere close to dislodging a provider that continues to impress with an ever-expanding portfolio

Eight years after Larry Ellison ridiculed the cloud as a manufactured buzzword that encompassed everything the computing industry was already doing, the CEO has reversed course and is looking to play a spoiler in a market that forecasters predict could top $120 billion in just four years. Ellison turned his keynote into a scathing critique of AWS and a forum to present Oracle in the disruptor role. Read more of this post

Verizon Pulls the Plug on Two Public Cloud Services

A. DeCarlo

A. DeCarlo

Summary Bullets:

• Verizon told customers it is discontinuing its Public Cloud Reserved Performance and Marketplace public cloud services in April and that clients of the former will need to migrate their virtual machines to another environment, preferably its own Virtual Private Cloud.

• While the company is sunsetting its credit card cloud service, Verizon will continue to support other IaaS solutions including Cloud Storage

More changes are afoot in the public cloud as yet another provider pulls the plug on its credit card payment-accepting IaaS offer. Verizon is ending support for its Public Cloud Reserved Performance on-demand compute service this spring. The provider is also shutting down its cloud marketplace in April, ending the company’s first shot at building an online catalog that would compete against similar cloud storefronts from the likes of Amazon and Microsoft. Read more of this post

Cloud Formations over Europe: Supply-Side Trends Align with Enterprise Demand

John Marcus

John Marcus

Summary Bullets:

  • Almost every week, a new survey is released which reports on growing enterprise demand for cloud services in Europe, or in a particular country market.  Service providers in the region are in many ways reacting to this data with new investments in infrastructure, channels, and services.  Since October 2012, we have tracked service provider events in the space, resulting in supply-side data points that help complete the picture.
  • Out of 159 cloud service provider announcements in Europe over the last nine months, more than half (94) had a pan-European or global impact.  Among country-specific activity, the UK was home to the most activity, with Germany and the Netherlands next but well behind.  Overall, Northern Europe accounted for far more activity than Southern or Eastern Europe.
  • In terms of the types of events, new and enhanced infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) solutions have surpassed software-as-a-service (SaaS) launches, which had led the pack back in in Q4 2012.  Platform-as-a-service (PaaS) accounted for the fewest events over the last nine months, but two announcements in June suggest PaaS activity might start to increase. Read more of this post

Government ‘Cloud Mandate’ Could Jumpstart Lagging Adoption in UK Public Sector and Beyond

John Marcus

John Marcus

Summary Bullets:

  • The UK government’s G-Cloud Programme has suffered from setbacks, leading to limited uptake so far.  However, two recent developments – the commencement of the new G-Cloud iii framework, doubling the number of approved CloudStore suppliers, and the confirmation by the government last month of its ‘cloud first’ procurement strategy – should jumpstart British public sector migration to the cloud.
  • Increased cloud adoption by government organizations, and indeed the high-level policy directive behind it, should have a knock-on effect within the enterprise market, first in semi-state and non-profit organizations and then increasingly in SME and corporate enterprises.

The G-Cloud Programme is a cross-government initiative led by two UK cabinet ministers (Justice and Home Office) as part of the official Government ICT Strategy, designed to leverage public cloud resources to reduce public sector spending and consolidate data centres.  The initial focus is on introducing cloud ICT services into government departments, local authorities and the wider public sector via a new procurement framework for IT services.  These services can then be reviewed and purchased through the G-Cloud’s CloudStore, which offers over 7,000 services from more than 700 suppliers in the areas of infrastructure (IaaS), software (SaaS), platform (PaaS), and specialist services. Read more of this post

Look for Operators to Lead Cloud Ecosystems

Jerry Caron

Jerry Caron

Summary Bullets:

  • Network operators are trusted sources in the consumer world; can this translate into the business world?
  • There is an opportunity for operators to be leaders in the cloud services ecosystem given their technological position.

A recent, exhaustive, global study by Ericsson’s ConsumerLab research group indicates that – perhaps somewhat surprisingly – network operators are tops when it comes to trust.  The context is information privacy and data security, and the issue is what online companies such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Google, and all the others should be allowed to do with the information shared by the consumer in their application environments. Read more of this post

Cloud Buyers Beware as Suppliers Struggle

J. Caron

J. Caron

Summary Bullets:

  • Service providers and technology companies are often criticized for being slow to market with cloud services.
  • The cloud is as transformative for suppliers as it could be for IT, so gain assurances of stability before buying.

It is sometimes too easy to be critical of large service providers and technology companies as they grapple with the latest whims and fancies of enterprise IT taste.  The current phenomenon of cloud-based service models is a striking case in point.  As demand – or perceived demand, at least – grows for cloud infrastructure and applications, it has become quite clear that traditional suppliers are being forced to engage in all sorts of organizational gymnastics to cobble together, sell and support the services.  You have to pity them, really.  The transition from selling boxes and software to selling a pay-per-drink service is pretty complicated.  How will the service be built?  On what network will it run – theirs or somebody else’s?  How do they bill?  How do they provide support?  What about the resellers and distributors?  How much will existing revenue be cannibalized? With whom do they partner? Read more of this post

Who Should Provide Your Cloud Infrastructure and How Would You Like to Pay?

M. Halama

M. Halama

Summary Bullets:

  • Data centres and networks, above all else, are key to enabling any cloud service.
  • The gatekeepers of infrastructure will not reap the early and mid-term rewards of cloud services.

Data centres and public networks are key to enabling clouds, whether they are IaaS, PaaS or SaaS; hybrid, private or public clouds.  The very notion of ‘the cloud’ springs from the visualization of networks and data centre elements as a cloud.  Without data centres, cloud content and applications have nowhere to be stored and interaction would not be possible.  Without public networks, cloud customers could not access centralized data centres.  So, data centre owners and network providers reasonably expect to gather a major chunk of the value from customers’ spending in the growing cloud market. Read more of this post