Brexit Is Forcing Business Decisions, but a ‘No Deal’ Scenario Puts the IT Focus Firmly on Risk Mitigation

J. Marcus

Summary Bullets:

  • Brexit is driving demand for risk management advice in IT as well as in financial and legal domains.
  • Integrators like DXC Technology are offering tactical and strategic solutions, suggesting the disruption of Brexit be used as an opportunity for transformation.

It should surprise no one that a ‘Brexit strategy advisory firm’ is a thing that exists. The increasing potential for the UK leaving the European Union in March 2019 without a trade deal in place is creating bittersweet opportunities not only for financial and legal advisors, but also in tech. Global IT services company DXC Technology has hooked up with specialist consultancy Brexit Partners as its UK and European customer base takes account of imminent risks. Other IT firms will soon be doing the same, if they’re not already. Continue reading “Brexit Is Forcing Business Decisions, but a ‘No Deal’ Scenario Puts the IT Focus Firmly on Risk Mitigation”

Microsoft Azure DevOps Touches on the Larger APLM Trend

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Microsoft has released Azure DevOps, a rebranding of VSTS, but also tools serving as its APLM contribution.
  • Modern application development architectures (microservices) and requirements (CICD) are driving the need for APLM.

Striving for a digital environment, enterprises are challenged to exploit the full benefits of cloud-enabled innovations, assembling solutions that combine and orchestrate both the business software and the infrastructure on which that software runs. While technology providers of switches, servers, cloud services, et al. have certainly set the stage for unified management, automation, and optimization, no single vendor is yet capable of managing the entire lifecycle of this amalgamation. Continue reading “Microsoft Azure DevOps Touches on the Larger APLM Trend”

Google Gives More Power to AI Within Its Data Centers, but the Biggest Opportunities Lie Ahead

C. Drake

Summary Bullets:

  • A newly autonomous AI algorithm operating Google’s data center cooling systems will be scrutinized to learn how AI can be applied to other areas of data center operations.
  • There are opportunities for Google to leverage its growing expertise in applying AI to internal operations by expanding the range of AI solutions it offers enterprise customers.

Google recently announced plans to give operational control over the cooling systems in its data centers to an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm. Using this algorithm, Google has already achieved a considerable reduction in the energy consumed by its 15 globally distributed data centers, with both cost and environmental implications. However, this latest move is significant because it represents a major first application of AI to data center operational control systems on a large scale. The initiative also provides another example of how AI can be deployed in data centers in ways that improve their operational efficiency, including their consumption of energy resources. Initiatives like this are becoming more common and are often included under the ‘AIOps’ (artificial intelligence for IT operations) banner, a term that refers to the use of big data analytics, machine learning (ML), and other AI technologies to automate the management of IT systems and processes. Continue reading “Google Gives More Power to AI Within Its Data Centers, but the Biggest Opportunities Lie Ahead”

Apple, Facebook, and Google Won’t Destroy Denmark’s Environmental Achievements

C. Drake

Summary Bullets:

  • New data centers operated by Apple, Facebook, and Google will contribute to rising energy consumption in Denmark over the next decade, coinciding with a growing shortfall of renewable energy.
  • Despite concerns about their environmental impact, hyperscale Internet firms are supporting various energy efficiency initiatives, including energy recycling and new data center design and deployment methods.

A recent Danish government memorandum raised new concerns about the long-term environmental impact of data centers operated by large Internet companies such as Apple, Facebook, and Google. However, while such concerns should be taken seriously, they need to be understood within the context of wider initiatives by hyperscale Internet firms to improve data center energy efficiency. Continue reading “Apple, Facebook, and Google Won’t Destroy Denmark’s Environmental Achievements”

Apple v. Pepper Elevated to U.S. Supreme Court, Where Developers Seek Acknowledgment

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • The U.S. Supreme Court is taking on the Apple v. Pepper antitrust case to determine whether the Apple iOS App Store represents an anti-competitive monopoly and, as such, whether users can sue Apple.
  • A ruling for Apple by the court will impact software developers’ ongoing role in providing the innovation behind mobile apps.

The newly pending U.S. Supreme Court case which will determine whether Apple’s App Store distribution model represents an anti-competitive monopoly could have far-reaching ramifications among software developers, whose collective brain trust is already at a premium and in great shortage. Continue reading “Apple v. Pepper Elevated to U.S. Supreme Court, Where Developers Seek Acknowledgment”

HPE Sets Out to Master the Edge While Extending Managed, Metered IT Consumption to Hybrid Cloud

C. Drake

Summary Bullets:

• HPE’s new EdgeLine portfolio enhancements will enable customers to run storage-intensive applications and additional core data center functions within remote edge locations.

• HPE’s new GreenLake Hybrid Cloud offering will appeal to hybrid cloud customers that struggle with things like cost and management complexity but won’t disrupt the wider market.

At its Discover event in Las Vegas a last week, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) unveiled several new solution updates and strategic initiatives which, it believes, will transform the way businesses consume, deploy and operate data center technologies. First, HPE announced plans to invest US$4 billion over the next four years to develop technologies that support enterprise edge computing. Edge computing promises to transform the way data centers are deployed and managed and the type of workloads they support. It enables the operation and allocation of enterprise IT resources – including compute, storage, networking, data management, and analytics – at locations that are closer to the points of data generation, and to the end users of digital content and applications.

HPE already has a number of products that support enterprise edge computing initiatives. These include its EdgeLine hyperconverged infrastructure systems, which are specifically designed for deployment in remote locations, often far from central data centers. In Vegas, HPE revealed that it was increasing the storage allocation available on its EL1000 and EL4000 models, from 4TB to 48TB, thanks to a new hardware add-on. The additional storage will allow EdgeLine to support more storage-intensive use cases at the edge of enterprise networks, including databases, artificial intelligence, and video applications. In addition, HPE announced that it had validated several enterprise software stacks for use with the EL1000 and EL4000 systems, including VMware, Microsoft SQL Server, SAP HANA and Citrix XenDesktop. By validating entire software stacks, rather than lighter, tailored versions, HPE aims to help customers run virtualization and compute functions at the network edge with the same tools they use in their primary data centers.
Continue reading “HPE Sets Out to Master the Edge While Extending Managed, Metered IT Consumption to Hybrid Cloud”

Consumerization of IT: Channel Partners Need to Adapt or Die

T. Banting

Summary Bullets:

• Public cloud services threaten traditional channels that have hitherto made their revenue through hardware and the service costs to design, install and maintain premises-based solutions.

• Integrators now need AV experience, networking and security expertise, plus the ability to code and customize apps to suit a customer’s workflow.

A persons’ consumer experience with technology continues to impact their expectations regarding the technology they use at work. This consumerization of IT (or CoIT) trend radically affects the collaboration and communications market, as vendors rapidly adapt to the new reality of a mobile-first, user-focused, and as-a-Service world. This highly influential trend predominated the recent InfoComm 2018 event in Las Vegas earlier this month, where over 200 collaboration and communications vendors exhibited and participated in educational sessions and panels. Partners that can’t adapt will be left behind and face irrelevance; consequently, this creates turbulence and opportunity for the industry and its ecosystem of suppliers.
Continue reading “Consumerization of IT: Channel Partners Need to Adapt or Die”

Microsoft’s $7.5 Billion GitHub Buy Illustrates Dire State of Developer Deficit

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Vendors ramping up coding campaigns get creative in the battle for programming expertise.
  • Microsoft makes a play to scoop up as much coding talent as possible.

Technology’s greatest deficit today is talent. As the digital era moves into a complex new phase of microservices, serverless computing, blockchain, and artificial intelligence (AI), drawing on the expertise of capable programmers and data scientists to help spur adoption of new technology solutions is more important than ever – and difficult. A recent surge in campaigns to attract developers and grow developer communities among application platforms vendors such as IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, Salesforce, and others reflects the increased importance of gaining vendor loyalties. Continue reading “Microsoft’s $7.5 Billion GitHub Buy Illustrates Dire State of Developer Deficit”

Red Hat Summit: New Tools Strengthen Red Hat’s DevOps Arsenal

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

• Advanced app platforms concepts introduced a year ago will be productized this year, including low-code capabilities, serverless computing, and reactive systems.

• Red Hat is slowly but steadily moving into some ALM capabilities such as container security via SSO, as well as microservices enhanced with Istio and Envoy.

Last week’s Red Hat Summit provided a roadmap for the open source software leader’s application development tools supporting next-generation architectures – including reactive microservices and serverless computing, along with peeks into plans for low-code capabilities and containerized security.

Numerous examples highlighted ways customers are leveraging RHEL and the OpenShift cloud platform to migrate apps to the cloud and create new cloud apps. As part of that strategy, Red Hat has reorganized its application platforms and DevOps initiatives into five distinct organizations: Agile integration, Cloud native development, Automation management, Hybrid cloud infrastructure, and IT optimization. (Please see Red Hat Summit: Modern Components for the next OSS DevOps Phase , May 15, 2018). Continue reading “Red Hat Summit: New Tools Strengthen Red Hat’s DevOps Arsenal”

Why Company Culture Is Critical to Successful Collaboration Technology Deployments

T. Banting

Summary Bullets:

  • Company culture is pivotal to the successful adoption of collaboration solutions.
  • Task cultures are more likely to succeed in reacting to change and adapting to the organizational challenges required to transform a business using collaborative solutions.

Technology alone does not allow a business to change and transform. It won’t make organizations more efficient, productive, creative, or innovative unless businesses are able to assimilate the technology into their culture. Company culture is pivotal to the successful adoption of collaboration solutions; indeed, oftentimes there is too much focus on technology rather than addressing change and rethinking how employees, partners, and customers work together. Continue reading “Why Company Culture Is Critical to Successful Collaboration Technology Deployments”