The Top Five DevOps Takeaways from Google Cloud Next

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Google made its play for the enterprise based on hefty investment abilities and innovation in app development platforms and data analytics.
  • Google says it’s doubling down this year, and already winning over half of its cloud deal bids.

Pitted against Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS, Google understands its messaging needs to address its ability to cater to the mission-critical businesses of global enterprises embarking on new digital initiatives. In a word, it’s about innovation. That’s exactly what execs focused on this week during Google Cloud Next in San Francisco: a shift from consumer to enterprise apps that will carry large organizations into the next wave of cloud computing, which spans from high-level concepts around applications that leverage AI and machine learning to build apps that actually learn outcomes to emerging DevOps app development models and architectures. (Please see this Advisory Report for more coverage.) Read more of this post

Serverless Computing: Newest Cloud Evolution Abstracts Infrastructure Complexities

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Serverless computing promises to further abstract and thereby simplify VM/server infrastructure complexities, while supporting pay-as-you-go models.
  • Serverless is a logical extension and evolution of the ideas of microservices, containerization tools, and cloud-oriented software development itself.

Serverless computing’s ability to eliminate next-generation application development/deployment complexities by stripping away as much code from the server as possible will usher in a number of cloud service rollouts this year. This begs the question: when should DevOps adopt this approach? This next evolution in cloud computing builds on the momentum of PaaS offerings, microservices development methodologies, and containerization tools like Docker Swarm and Kubernetes, to support agile app development through functions-as-a-service (FaaS). First brought to light a few years ago through Amazon’s AWS Lambda service, serverless computing – also known as FaaS – lets enterprise developers focus on writing code and not managing servers. The technology is based on the concept that when an event is triggered, a function is invoked automatically via a container to provide the context and execution framework for the work, all aimed at reducing operational requirements. A number of cloud providers are rolling out services this year based on investments in FaaS, so in addition to Amazon, buyers will be able to explore IBM OpenWhisk, Microsoft Azure Functions, Google Cloud Functions, and Pivotal Spring Cloud Function. Read more of this post

RAD’s Speed, Collaboration Key to Cloud Offerings in 2017

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • RAD goes hand-in-hand with microservices architecture and container deployment scenarios.
  • RAD vendors will continue to leverage OSS technologies including Cloud Foundry and Docker.

Rapid application development (RAD) platforms are a technology whose time has finally come with the advent of platform service, microservices architecture and containers. The low-code, high-productivity tools go hand-in-hand with new cloud infrastructures, architectures and deployment capabilities, because they address DevOps’ concerns around speed and efficiency, collaboration and accessing open source software to support portability. (Please see “PaaS Cloud Providers and SIs Will Bulk Up on RAD Technology,” January 20, 2017.) Read more of this post

How Lightweight Middleware and SOA Are Evolving into Fine-Grained Microservices

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • SOA supports the idea of reusing application development resources and functions, while a microservices architecture allows the same at a much more granular level.
  • Microservices plus automation addresses CI/CD via distributed service components.

During the next 12 months, we’ll see a flood of structured DevOps architectures emerge to support the growing microservices trend, which in turn fosters continuous deployment.

The emerging trend around microservices enhances traditional Java EE multitier/n-tier architectures with distributed service components and greater use of automation to support continuous integration, continuous deployment (CI/CD). Note that Java EE is considered the dominant standard for building next-generation, business-critical, distributed apps. By breaking an app down into smaller components, developers can target specific units of the app with more frequent updates. This enables more frequent deployments, which is where CI/CD comes into play. Read more of this post

The New PaaS Looks a Lot Like CaaS, with Orchestration

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

• The benefits of PaaS are being realized through a consistent deployment format, easing DevOps processes

• New microservices architectures and containers will usher in advanced technologies including serverless architectures

PaaS is evolving to address growing DevOps concerns through open technologies; these, in turn, support new architectures, new forms of deployment through containers, and necessary features including orchestration, management, monitoring, and push services. PaaS services have evolved beyond providing basic app hosting to address modern DevOps’ needs, including the ability to leverage hybrid cloud and multi-cloud portability to ensure continuous integration and continuous deployment (CICD). Platform services provide containerization with particular importance now being placed on the ability to deploy and orchestrate containers, with policy, in order to modernize and port legacy and new apps onto any cloud infrastructure. Read more of this post

Mobile App Platforms’ Role Continues to Evolve in API, IoT Era

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • MEAP vendors are focused on IoT platforms and user experience (UX) technologies, which aim to help enterprises reach new markets according to the usability of their mobile apps and their ability to connect things.
  • Low-code development platforms leverage the infrastructure strengths of public clouds, such as IBM Bluemix and Microsoft Azure, to create mobile apps that analyze and respond in real time.

The role of mobile enterprise application platforms (MEAP) and mobile services continues to evolve, not only as a significant component of business transformation projects, but also as a means for extending current business app use. What began as technology to support desktop web experiences subsequently moved to omnichannel, mobile-first, and cloud-first experiences. MEAP is now at the crux of connecting devices – mobile and otherwise – as well as serving as the UX backbone that will empower a broader group of stakeholders, from savvy developers to non-coding business users. The technology spans both front-end mobile app and website design frameworks as well as backend integration services. The role of mobile app platforms is maturing into one that connects people, devices, and data, while helping to drive business-transforming marketing programs. (For further reading, please see: Competitive Landscape Assessment: Mobile Enterprise Application Platforms (MEAP), October 21, 2016). Read more of this post

Salesforce DX: Consumer-Style, Source Driven Development Experience

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

• Salesforce DX will support popular standard development tools as part of its platform.

• The new platform experience will attract additional enterprise developers to its cloud services.

For enterprise developers, the most important news from Dreamforce 2016 was Salesforce DX—a new source-driven development experience (DX). The developer preview is based around externalizing source metadata, enabling the support of various open development tools to ease collaboration around metadata. Read more of this post

Oracle’s Recommitment to Mobile Opens Up DevOps and Cloud Opportunities

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Oracle aimed to demonstrate its commitment to mobile and platform services.
  • Oracle has several exciting solutions projects underway, including cognitive analytics, customer engagement services, RAD, container/microservices, and ‘function as a service’ (FaaS).

During last week’s OpenWorld, Oracle hammered home its commitment to mobility. The company rolled out a number of upcoming (some sooner than later) mobile products and features to convince enterprises it will be making significant investments in its mobile and platform services. Oracle has realized that advanced mobile services, cognitive analytics, and new microservices architectures are what’s going to drive and determine the success of its cloud services. Read more of this post

PaaS Messaging Needs to Include Containers to Address Top-of-Mind IT Ops Issues

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Container vendors’ messaging drives home code portability advantages.
  • PaaS vendors need to address IT ops deployment concerns through CaaS.

Container-as-a-service (CaaS) is a type of cloud service that addresses operational issues around infrastructure portability and management, making the emerging deployment technology a critical part of PaaS providers’ messaging.

Since PaaS earned a prominent spot in the cloud stack among IaaS and SaaS during the last two years, leading offerings – including IBM Bluemix, Microsoft Azure, and Red Hat OpenShift – have evolved beyond basic app hosting. Platform services are beginning to emphasize a container model as a way to ensure continuous integration and address IT operational concerns. Those concerns include being able to deploy and orchestrate containers (with policy) in order to modernize and port legacy and new apps onto any cloud infrastructure. Read more of this post

Microservices to Dominate PaaS Offerings; Efforts Receive Boost from MicroProfile Project

 

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • PaaS offerings are beginning to include container/microservices options.
  • The MicroProfile project seeks to ensure heterogeneous deployments of microservices apps.

Microservices efforts got a major boost during Red Hat’s recent annual conference, where the vendor presented its flagship PaaS OpenShift as a container platform while simultaneously launching a new community project, MicroProfile.io. The project acknowledges Java EE as the dominant standard for building next-generation, business-critical, distributed apps and aims to raise the bar among Java developers looking to move into microservices and container environments. Read more of this post