Corporate BYOD Policies Brings Security and Productivity

Gary Barton

Gary Barton

Summary Bullets:

  • Ignoring the impact of smartphones in the workplace is no longer an option.
  • A well constructed BYOD policy will deliver security and productivity benefits.

BT has this week gone to market with its latest bring your own device (BYOD) proposition, its BT Advise BYOD Quick Start suite, which includes monitoring and security services. BT’s launch has been backed by an accompanying white paper ‘Bring Your Own Device’. The conclusions of this report provide further proof that (as this writer has previously argued) enterprises can no longer afford to be without a BYOD policy. The research suggests that around 50% of employees are now formally allowed to use their mobile devices at work, but that actual usage rates are significantly higher. In other words, most companies now know that preventing mobile device usage is a losing battle. What is more significant for enterprises, however, is that 60% of the surveyed IT managers felt that using smart devices in the workplace increased worker efficiency and 84% of IT managers surveyed believe that a BYOD policy confers a competitive advantage, with 31% suggesting that a BYOD policy gives a ‘significant advantage’. Of employees surveyed, 59% stated that they use personal devices to access files from company servers. With productivity advantages on one side and real security risks on the other, perhaps the biggest surprise in BT and Cisco’s white paper was that the research suggested that the number of enterprises with an official BYOD policy in place has fallen. Read more of this post

Practice Makes Perfect, or at Least Safer

Amy Larsen DeCarlo

Amy Larsen DeCarlo

Summary Bullets

  • Cybercriminals have become increasingly sophisticated in the methods they use to breach the enterprise, but the biggest risk may still be plain old human error.
  • Recent research shows that lost physical documents, missing memory devices, and misplaced laptops are the source of more breaches than online hacking attacks.

As an industry, we spend a considerable amount of time dissecting the latest cyber attacks and forecasting where the next source of trouble will be.  We advocate for enterprises to mount multi-layer defenses against a diverse set of threats leveled by an increasingly well organized contingent of hackers motivated by profit or ideology.  However, recent research serves as a clear reminder that the biggest threat posed to an organization’s data security may not be driven by malice or money.  In fact, the biggest threat may come from plain old fashioned human error. Read more of this post

Look for Operators to Lead Cloud Ecosystems

Jerry Caron

Jerry Caron

Summary Bullets:

  • Network operators are trusted sources in the consumer world; can this translate into the business world?
  • There is an opportunity for operators to be leaders in the cloud services ecosystem given their technological position.

A recent, exhaustive, global study by Ericsson’s ConsumerLab research group indicates that – perhaps somewhat surprisingly – network operators are tops when it comes to trust.  The context is information privacy and data security, and the issue is what online companies such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Google, and all the others should be allowed to do with the information shared by the consumer in their application environments. Read more of this post

Security and the Cloud: Turning an Obstacle into a Proof Point

Amy Larsen DeCarlo

Amy Larsen DeCarlo

Summary Bullets:

  • Security remains both one of the top barriers to entry into the cloud and perhaps the greatest differentiator for enterprise-class cloud services.
  • Though the lack of common industry-wide standards remains a challenge, savvy cloud providers are finding innovative ways to demonstrate their ability to protect customer assets in an on-demand environment.

For understandable reasons, many organizations are wary enough about security today in the cloud to put off enterprise-wide migration plans far into the future.  With the on-demand model still a mystery to many and no clear cut industry-wide standards to establish baseline cloud computing specifications, enterprises are not willing to risk exposing critical assets to the unknown.  In Current Analysis’ 2012 survey on enterprise cloud adoption, security was cited as the single biggest concern associated with moving to a cloud strategy. Read more of this post