Cloud Formations over Europe: Supply-Side Trends Align with Enterprise Demand

John Marcus
John Marcus

Summary Bullets:

  • Almost every week, a new survey is released which reports on growing enterprise demand for cloud services in Europe, or in a particular country market.  Service providers in the region are in many ways reacting to this data with new investments in infrastructure, channels, and services.  Since October 2012, we have tracked service provider events in the space, resulting in supply-side data points that help complete the picture.
  • Out of 159 cloud service provider announcements in Europe over the last nine months, more than half (94) had a pan-European or global impact.  Among country-specific activity, the UK was home to the most activity, with Germany and the Netherlands next but well behind.  Overall, Northern Europe accounted for far more activity than Southern or Eastern Europe.
  • In terms of the types of events, new and enhanced infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) solutions have surpassed software-as-a-service (SaaS) launches, which had led the pack back in in Q4 2012.  Platform-as-a-service (PaaS) accounted for the fewest events over the last nine months, but two announcements in June suggest PaaS activity might start to increase. Continue reading “Cloud Formations over Europe: Supply-Side Trends Align with Enterprise Demand”

Government ‘Cloud Mandate’ Could Jumpstart Lagging Adoption in UK Public Sector and Beyond

John Marcus
John Marcus

Summary Bullets:

  • The UK government’s G-Cloud Programme has suffered from setbacks, leading to limited uptake so far.  However, two recent developments – the commencement of the new G-Cloud iii framework, doubling the number of approved CloudStore suppliers, and the confirmation by the government last month of its ‘cloud first’ procurement strategy – should jumpstart British public sector migration to the cloud.
  • Increased cloud adoption by government organizations, and indeed the high-level policy directive behind it, should have a knock-on effect within the enterprise market, first in semi-state and non-profit organizations and then increasingly in SME and corporate enterprises.

The G-Cloud Programme is a cross-government initiative led by two UK cabinet ministers (Justice and Home Office) as part of the official Government ICT Strategy, designed to leverage public cloud resources to reduce public sector spending and consolidate data centres.  The initial focus is on introducing cloud ICT services into government departments, local authorities and the wider public sector via a new procurement framework for IT services.  These services can then be reviewed and purchased through the G-Cloud’s CloudStore, which offers over 7,000 services from more than 700 suppliers in the areas of infrastructure (IaaS), software (SaaS), platform (PaaS), and specialist services. Continue reading “Government ‘Cloud Mandate’ Could Jumpstart Lagging Adoption in UK Public Sector and Beyond”

Taking Cloud to Both Ends of the Spectrum

Amy Larsen DeCarlo
Amy Larsen DeCarlo

Summary Bullets:

  • As enterprises embrace the cloud for broader use, providers are responding in kind with improved functionality and more services options aimed at customers at either end of the market spectrum (i.e., large enterprises and entry-level users).
  • Is there a risk these solutions will leave out the bulk of customers in the middle?

A new year means a new set of predictions for what is to come in the months ahead for IT.  Front and center in most prognostications are projections about 2013 being a big year for the cloud.  You won’t hear any arguments to the contrary here, as all signs point to broader market acceptance of and demand for cloud services.  At the same time, cloud providers are stepping up their portfolios with better features, simpler ordering and provisioning, and new pricing models that match the needs of a more diverse prospect pool.  Continue reading “Taking Cloud to Both Ends of the Spectrum”