Public Cloud Wars Will Heat Up in 2017; Amazon and Google Battle Microsoft via Middleware Partnerships

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

• Enterprises seeking greater infrastructure and data/application services efficiency are moving cloud-native and hybrid cloud application development to the public cloud.

• The next phase of cloud computing growth will be driven by containers, microservices, and Functions-as-a-Service, specifically those supporting mobile and IoT platform services.

Cloud-native and hybrid cloud application development is making its way to the public cloud as enterprises increasingly see Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) as a viable infrastructure and data/application services model. In the past week, AWS and GCP separately increased their app development arsenal by way of two key middleware and mobile middleware partnerships. Read more of this post

How Lightweight Middleware and SOA Are Evolving into Fine-Grained Microservices

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • SOA supports the idea of reusing application development resources and functions, while a microservices architecture allows the same at a much more granular level.
  • Microservices plus automation addresses CI/CD via distributed service components.

During the next 12 months, we’ll see a flood of structured DevOps architectures emerge to support the growing microservices trend, which in turn fosters continuous deployment.

The emerging trend around microservices enhances traditional Java EE multitier/n-tier architectures with distributed service components and greater use of automation to support continuous integration, continuous deployment (CI/CD). Note that Java EE is considered the dominant standard for building next-generation, business-critical, distributed apps. By breaking an app down into smaller components, developers can target specific units of the app with more frequent updates. This enables more frequent deployments, which is where CI/CD comes into play. Read more of this post

What Enterprises Can Expect from Enterprise Mobility Services Providers

K. Weldon

K. Weldon

Summary Bullets:

  • Current Analysis’s recently updated reports on global enterprise mobility services providers show relatively static portfolios.
  • There were some notable exceptions, with some providers focused on new business tariffs, network upgrades, and security enhancements, along with portfolio restructuring to add simplicity.

In October, Current Analysis updated its profiles on the leading global enterprise mobility services providers, including both operator-led or operator-affiliated companies (AT&T, Verizon, Vodafone, DT/T-Systems, BT, Orange Business Services, and Telefonica) and IT service providers (IBM, CSC, HPE, and Accenture). While some aspects of these providers’ portfolios have been stagnant (or stable, depending on one’s interpretation) over the last six months, two things stand out. First, while portfolios may not have not changed dramatically, this does not imply that service providers believe there are limited growth opportunities in the market; and, second, for those companies that did add new services or restructured their portfolios, differentiation is important. As a result, pricing or service elements may need recrafting to meet customer needs more effectively and competitively. Read more of this post

Mobile App Platforms’ Role Continues to Evolve in API, IoT Era

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • MEAP vendors are focused on IoT platforms and user experience (UX) technologies, which aim to help enterprises reach new markets according to the usability of their mobile apps and their ability to connect things.
  • Low-code development platforms leverage the infrastructure strengths of public clouds, such as IBM Bluemix and Microsoft Azure, to create mobile apps that analyze and respond in real time.

The role of mobile enterprise application platforms (MEAP) and mobile services continues to evolve, not only as a significant component of business transformation projects, but also as a means for extending current business app use. What began as technology to support desktop web experiences subsequently moved to omnichannel, mobile-first, and cloud-first experiences. MEAP is now at the crux of connecting devices – mobile and otherwise – as well as serving as the UX backbone that will empower a broader group of stakeholders, from savvy developers to non-coding business users. The technology spans both front-end mobile app and website design frameworks as well as backend integration services. The role of mobile app platforms is maturing into one that connects people, devices, and data, while helping to drive business-transforming marketing programs. (For further reading, please see: Competitive Landscape Assessment: Mobile Enterprise Application Platforms (MEAP), October 21, 2016). Read more of this post

Oracle’s Recommitment to Mobile Opens Up DevOps and Cloud Opportunities

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Oracle aimed to demonstrate its commitment to mobile and platform services.
  • Oracle has several exciting solutions projects underway, including cognitive analytics, customer engagement services, RAD, container/microservices, and ‘function as a service’ (FaaS).

During last week’s OpenWorld, Oracle hammered home its commitment to mobility. The company rolled out a number of upcoming (some sooner than later) mobile products and features to convince enterprises it will be making significant investments in its mobile and platform services. Oracle has realized that advanced mobile services, cognitive analytics, and new microservices architectures are what’s going to drive and determine the success of its cloud services. Read more of this post

Service Provider Selection for IoT Varies Substantially by Vertical Industry – Good News for Telcos

K. Weldon

K. Weldon

Summary Bullets:

  • A recent Current Analysis survey on IoT investments showed that companies vary substantially on what kind of service provider they trust to provide them with consulting and professional services.
  • While equipment vendors and professional/IT service providers were selected most often, enterprises in several verticals consistently preferred communication service providers or software providers for integration and app development.

Enterprises investing in IoT deployments nearly always need help along the way. Some go to third parties for proof-of-concept testing and upfront business and technical consulting, while others need help in assembling and managing disparate hardware and software elements. Many also need an outside developer for application development and many go to professional service providers for data analytics. In a survey conducted this spring among 1,000 U.S. and global enterprises, Current Analysis asked businesses what kind of provider they sought out for these functions; choices included equipment vendors, software providers, professional/IT service providers, and communication service providers (CSPs). Read more of this post

PaaS Messaging Needs to Include Containers to Address Top-of-Mind IT Ops Issues

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Container vendors’ messaging drives home code portability advantages.
  • PaaS vendors need to address IT ops deployment concerns through CaaS.

Container-as-a-service (CaaS) is a type of cloud service that addresses operational issues around infrastructure portability and management, making the emerging deployment technology a critical part of PaaS providers’ messaging.

Since PaaS earned a prominent spot in the cloud stack among IaaS and SaaS during the last two years, leading offerings – including IBM Bluemix, Microsoft Azure, and Red Hat OpenShift – have evolved beyond basic app hosting. Platform services are beginning to emphasize a container model as a way to ensure continuous integration and address IT operational concerns. Those concerns include being able to deploy and orchestrate containers (with policy) in order to modernize and port legacy and new apps onto any cloud infrastructure. Read more of this post

Vested Interests Are Delaying the Formation of Critical Mass in the IoT Market

I. Grant

I. Grant

Summary Bullets:

  • The cellular industry is scrambling to catch up with LPWA providers, but its solutions are not yet fit for purpose.
  • The jury (a.k.a. software developers and customers) is still out as technology vendors pursue their own agendas.

Leading figures in the LTE supply chain, including chip makers, device makers, equipment vendors and even operators, are following their own agendas. This is creating a kaleidoscopic picture of the IoT wireless access market that inhibits investment.

Driven by the fear of missing out, the cellular phone industry is fighting to get back on terms with suppliers of proprietary low-power, wide-area (LPWA) network access technologies for machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. Anyone who needs networks to provide low-cost access and operation to justify their IoT deployments should have regard for the claims and counterclaims made by the various parties. While there is some truth in all the claims, by no means is it the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Read more of this post

IoT Security: Still a Work in Progress

K. Weldon

K. Weldon

Summary Bullets:

  • Security is still the top concern and often prevents companies from launching deployments that would otherwise provide benefits, according to a recent IoT survey conducted by Current Analysis among 1,000 businesses worldwide.
  • Operators are finally addressing some of these fears with assorted services and technologies – either their own or through an assortment of partner solutions.

A survey conducted recently by Current Analysis among 1,000 enterprises on their investments in IoT technology disclosed a fact that should not surprise anyone who follows the IoT market: security is still a key concern. One-third of the businesses surveyed listed it as their top worry, and 17% of the companies surveyed that had evaluated but chosen not to implement an IoT project cited security concerns as the primary reason. Read more of this post

Microservices to Dominate PaaS Offerings; Efforts Receive Boost from MicroProfile Project

 

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • PaaS offerings are beginning to include container/microservices options.
  • The MicroProfile project seeks to ensure heterogeneous deployments of microservices apps.

Microservices efforts got a major boost during Red Hat’s recent annual conference, where the vendor presented its flagship PaaS OpenShift as a container platform while simultaneously launching a new community project, MicroProfile.io. The project acknowledges Java EE as the dominant standard for building next-generation, business-critical, distributed apps and aims to raise the bar among Java developers looking to move into microservices and container environments. Read more of this post