IBM’s Quantum Roadmap for 2025 Brings Practicality and Excitement

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:    

  • IBM’s roadmap for quantum computing leans heavily into software/development as the interface to make solving problems on quantum computers as easy as it is on classical systems.
  • IBM’s introduction of its modular quantum computing plan will allow, in the long term, parallelization of quantum computing, essentially creating larger quantum CPUs out of several smaller ones.

As it has been for the last several years, the quantum computing market is again boiling with a great deal of vim and vigor.  In May 2022, IBM made an announcement that it is expanding its roadmap for quantum computing, particularly at a large scale with a focus on realistic problems. IBM’s very near-term, previously disclosed roadmap includes the 433-qubit processor named IBM Osprey, which the company expects to make available later this year. In 2023, IBM intends to introduce IBM Condor, a quantum CPU that reaches 1,000+ cubits.

Continue reading “IBM’s Quantum Roadmap for 2025 Brings Practicality and Excitement”

Employee Monitoring Has Unintended Consequences

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

  • Productivity monitoring software causes more unintentional harm than good.
  • Companies that implement productivity monitoring software will suffer from more turnover and have a much more difficult time in hiring.

While often talked about separately, the Great Resignation and work from home (WFH) are inextricably linked.  Both are pandemic-born and have propagated a number of technological trends, including greater focus on security, collaboration, and productivity. But technology is not always the solution. In this case, the proliferation of monitoring software and the relative enthusiasm for it can and will backfire spectacularly. Continue reading “Employee Monitoring Has Unintended Consequences”

Follow the Hardware to Gauge Enterprise Metaverse Adoption

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• Headset hardware, especially size and weight, is the greatest inhibitor of metaverse plans coming to large scale fruition

• The speed and commitment of headset hardware vendors is an indicator of metaverse acceleration

Hype over the metaverse may be subsiding slightly as world events overtake everyone’s available attention, but one of the biggest inhibitors to the fruition of the metaverse is headset hardware. AR or VR glasses are available, but it is reasonable to look at the large, clunky, and tethered-box offerings that dominate the market as the current equivalent of acoustic modem adapters or six-pound “mobile” phones.

Continue reading “Follow the Hardware to Gauge Enterprise Metaverse Adoption”

Cisco and Private 5G – Clarification

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• Cisco’s Private 5G solution will be offered through its service provider partners

• Enterprises need the integration of private 5G solutions with their existing network management, identity, and policy tools

In early February, Cisco made an announcement of some new Wi-Fi 6E access points, new Catalyst switches, and lastly the new Cisco Private 5G offering, and I wrote a report for our clients about it. However, there was a mistake on my part. I posited that Cisco was challenging the service providers and offering the product directly to customers. The truth is that Cisco is offering its new Cisco Private 5G offering with service provider partners, not against them. Cisco was kind enough to point out my mistake and provided me with more details on their go to market strategy for Cisco Private 5G. For that mistake, I apologize to Cisco. However, it does bring up the opportunity to talk a little bit more about why the Cisco Private 5G offering is important to enterprises, regardless of where it was sourced.

Continue reading “Cisco and Private 5G – Clarification”

The Myths of the Metaverse  

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

  • The metaverse should be divided into the consumer metaverse (CMV) and enterprise metaverse (EMV) segments for discussion.
  • Metaverse proponents must get past over-enthusiastic, get-rich-quick thinking and provide real value, particularly in the EMV segment.

The inaugural report on the metaverse from the enterprise technology group at GlobalData is now available to subscribers.  Discussion centers on not only the origins of the term ‘metaverse,’ but also hype, pitfalls, value, and the need to divide the market, at least at a high level.  GlobalData subscribers can read it here.

The metaverse can be logically divided into two macro parts: the CMV and the EMV.  At the time of this writing, momentum is coming from the CMV, where companies like Meta Platforms (Facebook) are driving interest, money, and attention.  The vast majority of the hardware is also coming from the CMV, at least for now.  This is one of those rare occasions when the technology flows up into the enterprise from the consumer space. Continue reading “The Myths of the Metaverse  “

NVIDIA and ARM Merger May Be Off – And That’s Good

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

  • There are multiple reports that the NVIDIA-ARM deal is dead, but nothing has been officially announced.
  • ARM remaining independent is a good thing for the vitality of the ARM processor market.

This week, the market has been swirling with rumors that NVIDIA is about to drop its proposed $40 billion purchase of ARM. For those of you who do not follow the CPU chip market, ARM is one of the most important companies out there.  Nearly every single smartphone uses a variant of ARM’s designs.  ARM chips, with their steady architecture, good performance, and excellent power/thermal characteristics, are used in a staggeringly wide array of applications from consumer goods to specialized equipment for vertical industries. Continue reading “NVIDIA and ARM Merger May Be Off – And That’s Good”

NVIDIA and Arm Deal in Regulatory Peril

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• The NVIDIA-Arm deal has interesting technological potential, but will likely chill competition

• Regulators worldwide are viewing big tech deals with an increasingly skeptical eye

In the ongoing saga of NVIDIA’s proposed purchase of the UK-based silicon design firm Arm Semiconductor Ltd. regulators have stepped in to stop the deal. Arm develops the architecture of the ARM processor, and then licenses it to other companies for use in their designs. ARM-derived processors have become extremely popular, appearing in almost every modern smartphone design, thousands of other proprietary, servers, and probably most famously as the latest CPU architecture for the Macintosh line of computers from Apple. Amazon’s AWS service has servers that AWS developed that use ARM architecture. In short, ARM is essentially everywhere and only Intel’s x86 architecture has had more success. ARM is the first processor architecture to get anywhere close and is considered vital in the technology marketplace.

Continue reading “NVIDIA and Arm Deal in Regulatory Peril”

Data, Data Everywhere

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• New analytics around network and application performance are bringing great visibility to administrators

• These new data sources rarely work with other data sources, making piecing together a picture difficult for enterprises

This is the age of analytics. Well, perhaps the computer era has always been the age of analytics, but today we are seeing a lot more discussions of analytics in general. Areas that are particularly suited to analytics are networking, as well as application performance. These areas are particularly suited because they deal with, for the most part, defined and known measurables. For instance, in networking, packet loss, latency, etc. are all known measurables. In application performance monitoring, you can measure application response time, error rates, and number of application instances among other application specific variables. There is a whole market dedicated to application performance monitoring, to say nothing of the newer observability platforms designed to help DevOps practitioners monitor performance.

Continue reading “Data, Data Everywhere”

A Different Approach to Solving Work From Home Connectivity and Security

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• The challenge is for IT to improve the experience for the work from home user

• Palo Alto Networks Okyo Garde addresses issues many enterprise work from home (WFH) solutions do not

The subject of WFH has had a lot of attention, with the COVID-19 pandemic forcing the issue for a lot of companies. Many companies have taken advantage of this and have moved their employees to permanent work from home status or only in the office a few select days of the week. The struggle since the beginning of the pandemic has been to support these home users. IT departments strived mightily and, in many cases, bootstrapped solutions that could at least get the home worker up and running. But now these same IT departments are taking a closer look at more effective and permanent solutions. Issues with home networks, particularly Wi-Fi, ergonomics, and even things as basic as monitors and chairs need to be addressed – they are all part of the WFH equation.

Continue reading “A Different Approach to Solving Work From Home Connectivity and Security”

Security and Networking Consolidation Needs Concrete Examples

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• Security and networking are converging, the evidence is clear, both from a technological and strategic standpoint, with security threats increasing.

• The enterprise needs tools to manage the human aspects of security and networking convergence and the fist instrument they need is real industry examples proving the trend from vendors, ITSP, carriers, and industry analysts.

By design and necessity, the security and networking industries are moving towards consolidation. Security companies are buying networking resources and networking companies are snapping up security vendors left and right. If you address a room full of vendors from the security and networking markets and proclaim that the two markets are converging, you will get heads nodding sagely. But the reality on the ground is much more complicated. Much like a stone arch, something has to move before things begin to fall in the direction gravity is pulling them.

Continue reading “Security and Networking Consolidation Needs Concrete Examples”