Cisco Systems Should Buy MobileIron: Here’s Why

E. Parizo

E. Parizo

Summary Bullets:

  • Cisco’s enterprise security portfolio lacks a strong play on mobile devices, especially those running iOS or Android.
  • By acquiring MobileIron, Cisco would gain strong enterprise EMM technology and the much-needed ability to enforce policy on disconnected mobile devices.

Tech industry prognosticators enjoy speculating about what companies Cisco will acquire next. In enterprise security, the vendor has a several needs, perhaps none more glaring than the need for improved mobile device security and policy enforcement.

Cisco’s security objective is to offer end-to-end security from the cloud to the endpoint, but it lacks a strong play on mobile devices – iOS and Android in particular – which has become crucial. On-network devices can benefit from the protection afforded by its network security capabilities, but when mobile devices leave the network, they are vulnerable, particularly to inbound malware. Read more of this post

Fortinet’s Special Opportunity Calls for Equally Special Leadership

Summary Bullets:

E. Parizo

E. Parizo

• Fortinet has become a $1 billion enterprise security powerhouse, with potential for much more.
• To become the next Cisco, however, Fortinet will need unique, ambitious leadership.

It’s worth taking a moment to consider how far Fortinet has come. From humble beginnings in 2000 as a UTM startup, today Fortinet is a $1 billion enterprise security powerhouse, having shipped nearly twice as many security appliances as Cisco Systems (or anyone else) in the past three years and boasting more than 270,000 customers worldwide.

Fortinet has a unique opportunity. It, along with Palo Alto Networks (PAN), is on pace to surpass rival Cisco in quarterly security appliance revenue as soon as the next 12 months, and unlike PAN, Fortinet has long been profitable. Combine that with its broad product portfolio, its penchant for innovation, and its consistent ability execute in nearly all facets of its business, and it’s clear Fortinet can not only end Cisco’s market dominance, but it is also poised to become the next Cisco. Read more of this post

Dear Intel, Here’s Why Selling Intel Security Would be a Huge Mistake

Summary Bullets:
• A rumored sale of its security business would be a major mistake for Intel.

• Intel Security has strong legacy products, promising new ones, winning leadership and strategy, and presents synergistic opportunities key to Intel’s future.

I’m not sure what surprised me more: Sunday’s Financial Times report that Intel was exploring a sale of its security division, or that industry observers and partners alike seem to be either indifferent or actually in favor of such a dramatic move.

Current Analysis believes a sale of Intel Security or its assets would be a mistake, for a variety of reasons. Here’s a brief look at the value Intel Security provides its parent:

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Verizon DBIR Controversy Highlights Need for Data-Driven Research Transparency

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E. Parizo

Summary Bullets:

  • The recent DBIR controversy over a seemingly flawed top 10 list is an opportunity to highlight that data-driven security research is no panacea for breach prevention.
  • Data-driven security research shouldn’t be a drive to develop conclusions; it should an attempt to foster discussion and collaboration.

The annual release of the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report is usually widely anticipated and well received for its data-driven insights on which attack techniques led to successful data breaches in the previous year, and what preventative actions enterprises might undertake to avoid future attacks.

This year’s report, however, has been unusually criticized because the authors’ list of the top 10 most exploited vulnerabilities (in successful breaches) seemed flawed to many vulnerability experts. Read more of this post

A Case Study in EMM-to-UEM Market Evolution Highlights the Coming of Security-centric Endpoint Management

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E. Parizo

Summary Bullets

• EMM vendors, responding to the convergence of traditional and mobile endpoint technology, are driving the emergence of unified endpoint management.

• With mobility becoming ubiquitous, enterprises want to deliver users a consistent, secure endpoint experience, regardless of what device they use, where they’re located and who owns the device itself.

As detailed in our recent market advisory report, Ubiquitous Mobility and the Coming Transition from EMM to UEM, the rapid evolution of enterprise mobility management products in response to the convergence of traditional and mobile endpoint technology is driving the emergence of a new market segment called unified endpoint management (UEM).

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Fortinet Loses Another Marketing VP, and Loses Another Chance to Cure Its Ills

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E. Parizo

Summary Bullets:

• CMO Holly Rollo has resigned from Fortinet after just six months at the company.

• Fortinet, which has struggled with marketing, must make changes to stop driving away talented executives.

Count this analyst among those who were surprised and disappointed when news broke this week that Fortinet CMO Holly Rollo had resigned. Rollo, hired away from FireEye in September, had been handpicked by Oracle CMO and Fortinet Director Judith Sim to lead a marketing overhaul for the billion-dollar network security vendor. Read more of this post

McAfee Must Die: Why the Brand Has Outlived Its Usefulness to Intel Security

Summary Bullets:
• The once-strong McAfee brand now does Intel Security more harm than good.
• The vendor missed an opportunity for a portfolio-wide rebranding in late 2015 when it launched a new threat-centric product strategy.

Intel Security has a branding conundrum on its hands. The once-strong McAfee label, for decades associated with a venerable line of consumer and business security products, has been slowly losing its luster for years, but has now reached the point where it does the vendor more harm than good.

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Enterprise Security: Three Themes We’re Watching in 2016

Summary Bullets:

• Another flurry of security vendor acquisitions is likely in 2016, thanks largely to slowing venture capital investing.

• Best-of-breed product integration and automation capabilities will be top industry storylines this year.

Many of you surely agree that end-of-year predictions articles are a tired trope, rolled out by publishers as click-bait while their staffs enjoy a holiday vacation. Here at Current Analysis, the Enterprise Security team (yes, it’s a team of one!) decided not to stare into the crystal ball last year, but with the first month of 2016 coming to a close, we wanted to highlight three trends that are guiding our research efforts this year.

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BlackBerry Unveils its Good Technology Integration Strategy: Hurry Up and Wait

Summary Bullets:

• BlackBerry is deliberately choosing a measured pace for its Good integration, eschewing aggressive competitors and patient investors.

• As the future platform combines BES and Good Dynamics, Good for Enterprise customers may find themselves on the outside looking in.

On a call for customers this week, BlackBerry offered a strategic update on its Good Technology acquisition, specifically focusing on the technological synergies between the two product portfolios, and the current and future value proposition for current and new customers. While the event was long on hype and short on technical detail, there were several notable takeaways. Read more of this post

What’s Wrong with FireEye? Here’s a Hint: It’s Not China

Summary Bullets:
• FireEye’s CEO is disingenuous in trying to blame reduced cyberattacks by China for its Q3 earnings miss.

• The reality is FireEye is suffering from increased competition, poor public perception and inability to execute.

Threat detection vendor FireEye caused quite a stir in the security and investment communities last week following its third-quarter earnings announcement. Despite record revenue topping $165 million, FireEye missed both revenue and earnings estimates, posting a net loss of $123 million. That in itself isn’t remarkable; companies disappoint Wall Street every day. What caused heads to turn was the intimation by FireEye CEO Dave DeWalt that it fell short because of reduced cyberespionage activity originating from China, what he called “a reduction in the threat landscape,” which in turn reduced business opportunities for FireEye. Read more of this post