VMworld 2016: VMware’s Plans for Cloud Domination

M. Fratto

M. Fratto

Summary Bullets:

  • One key strategy VMware employs is attempting to commoditize infrastructure through abstraction and virtualization.
  • Cloud providers need to watch as VMware’s strategy unfolds, ensuring they aren’t commoditized as well.

With Cross-Cloud Services, VMware wants to commoditize cloud services just like it sped up the commoditization of x86 servers. During the keynote demo of the tech preview, VMware replicated much of the functionality found in various cloud dashboards, but more importantly, Cross-Cloud Services consolidates the views into a consistent and cohesive dashboard. I think it’s a pretty impressive effort and I’m curious to see the final product, but as impressed as I may be, I can’t help but consider VMware’s endgame as it tries to manage all the clouds. Read more of this post

Service Provider Selection for IoT Varies Substantially by Vertical Industry – Good News for Telcos

K. Weldon

K. Weldon

Summary Bullets:

  • A recent Current Analysis survey on IoT investments showed that companies vary substantially on what kind of service provider they trust to provide them with consulting and professional services.
  • While equipment vendors and professional/IT service providers were selected most often, enterprises in several verticals consistently preferred communication service providers or software providers for integration and app development.

Enterprises investing in IoT deployments nearly always need help along the way. Some go to third parties for proof-of-concept testing and upfront business and technical consulting, while others need help in assembling and managing disparate hardware and software elements. Many also need an outside developer for application development and many go to professional service providers for data analytics. In a survey conducted this spring among 1,000 U.S. and global enterprises, Current Analysis asked businesses what kind of provider they sought out for these functions; choices included equipment vendors, software providers, professional/IT service providers, and communication service providers (CSPs). Read more of this post

PaaS Messaging Needs to Include Containers to Address Top-of-Mind IT Ops Issues

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Container vendors’ messaging drives home code portability advantages.
  • PaaS vendors need to address IT ops deployment concerns through CaaS.

Container-as-a-service (CaaS) is a type of cloud service that addresses operational issues around infrastructure portability and management, making the emerging deployment technology a critical part of PaaS providers’ messaging.

Since PaaS earned a prominent spot in the cloud stack among IaaS and SaaS during the last two years, leading offerings – including IBM Bluemix, Microsoft Azure, and Red Hat OpenShift – have evolved beyond basic app hosting. Platform services are beginning to emphasize a container model as a way to ensure continuous integration and address IT operational concerns. Those concerns include being able to deploy and orchestrate containers (with policy) in order to modernize and port legacy and new apps onto any cloud infrastructure. Read more of this post

IoT Tech Developers & Establishing the Business Value of Their Innovations

J. Marcheck

J. Marcheck

Summary Bullets:

  • Industrial IoT (IIoT) monitoring and control technology development is happening at nearly all levels of the economy from large industrial vendors and tech startups to local incubators seeking to export solutions designed for local problems.
  • While there is an understandable focus on what is possible with IIoT monitoring and control, there also needs to be a clearer connection between much of this technology development and the business value it brings it IIoT buyers.

At a tech meetup in Austin, Texas, I recently had the chance to hear Digi.City founder Chelsea Collier and Pecan Street CIO Bert Haskell discuss his group’s focus on developing IoT technology R&D and disseminating that technology into the broader ecosystem.

By way of background, Pecan Street is a non-profit, funded by a combination of grants and a commercial revenue stream to “advance research and innovation in water and energy.” During the hour-long conversation, Mr. Haskell discussed a variety of topics related to how his team approaches technology development and how Pecan Street seeks to share (evangelize) its technology on a global basis; and though not directly, he also touched on some key challenges facing IoT-related technology commercialization. Read more of this post

Fortinet’s Special Opportunity Calls for Equally Special Leadership

Summary Bullets:

E. Parizo

E. Parizo

• Fortinet has become a $1 billion enterprise security powerhouse, with potential for much more.
• To become the next Cisco, however, Fortinet will need unique, ambitious leadership.

It’s worth taking a moment to consider how far Fortinet has come. From humble beginnings in 2000 as a UTM startup, today Fortinet is a $1 billion enterprise security powerhouse, having shipped nearly twice as many security appliances as Cisco Systems (or anyone else) in the past three years and boasting more than 270,000 customers worldwide.

Fortinet has a unique opportunity. It, along with Palo Alto Networks (PAN), is on pace to surpass rival Cisco in quarterly security appliance revenue as soon as the next 12 months, and unlike PAN, Fortinet has long been profitable. Combine that with its broad product portfolio, its penchant for innovation, and its consistent ability execute in nearly all facets of its business, and it’s clear Fortinet can not only end Cisco’s market dominance, but it is also poised to become the next Cisco. Read more of this post

Vested Interests Are Delaying the Formation of Critical Mass in the IoT Market

I. Grant

I. Grant

Summary Bullets:

  • The cellular industry is scrambling to catch up with LPWA providers, but its solutions are not yet fit for purpose.
  • The jury (a.k.a. software developers and customers) is still out as technology vendors pursue their own agendas.

Leading figures in the LTE supply chain, including chip makers, device makers, equipment vendors and even operators, are following their own agendas. This is creating a kaleidoscopic picture of the IoT wireless access market that inhibits investment.

Driven by the fear of missing out, the cellular phone industry is fighting to get back on terms with suppliers of proprietary low-power, wide-area (LPWA) network access technologies for machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. Anyone who needs networks to provide low-cost access and operation to justify their IoT deployments should have regard for the claims and counterclaims made by the various parties. While there is some truth in all the claims, by no means is it the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Read more of this post

Amazon Web Services Summit: Real-time IoT Insights via SQL? Say Hello to Kinesis Analytics

B. Shimmin

B. Shimmin

Summary Bullets:

  • IoT platforms from major cloud platform players are quickly emerging, bringing to bear the economies of scale only available with the public cloud to the task of instrumenting business.
  • No stranger to the public cloud, Amazon announced a new streaming analytics service that will open up IoT to a broad range of ISVs and enterprises by blending the familiarity of SQL with both speed and scale.

While enduring some pretty extreme heat (an index of over 110 degrees) in New York City late last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Summit, where I took in a particularly interesting keynote address given by the CTO and VP of Amazon.com, Dr. Werner Vogels. During his speech, Mr. Vogels trumped a familiar idea about digital transformation – basically, that companies abandon analog methods in favor of those digital – and the reasons why this is necessary not just to compete, but to remain in business. Read more of this post

Going Digital: Manufacturing is Taking the New Connected World Very Seriously

B. Washburn

B. Washburn

Summary Bullets:
• The manufacturing sector is pulling far ahead of other vertical segments when it comes to going digital.

• Manufacturers are working new digital business on two vectors: Intelligence on their factory floor; and embedded in the products they build and ship.

Here at Current Analysis, we’ve been hearing our share of hype related to the Internet of Things (IoT). As interesting as sensors and connectivity and analytics might be individually, it’s really about the combination of these elements to create totally new digital business models. There’s no shortage of service provider and vendor pitches for going digital. The industry has its photogenic poster children, like Progressive’s behavior-based insurance program; GM OnStar connected car and telematics; and GE Predix with its comprehensive aircraft engine analytics.

Read more of this post