Prudence in the Wake of the FCC’s Ruling on Marriott Jamming WiFi

Mike Fratto
Mike Fratto

Summary Bullets:

  • The FCC’s ruling finding Marriott guilty of jamming a conference goer’s hotspot will have a profound impact on companies of all stripes.
  • Until there is clarification on when or if over-the-air WiFi management is acceptable, not using such management techniques would be prudent.

On October 3, the FCC found that Marriott International had jammed a personal hotspot in the Nashville Gaylord Opryland resort convention center. Marriott International countered, saying it “has a strong interest in ensuring that when our guests use our WiFi service, they will be protected from rogue wireless hotspots that can cause degraded service, insidious cyber-attacks and identity theft.” Marriott went on to say that many companies use containment features – on FCC approved devices, no less – to manage airspace, making it a common and accepted practice. Continue reading “Prudence in the Wake of the FCC’s Ruling on Marriott Jamming WiFi”

Unified Communications: An Oxymoron That Finally Makes Sense

Tim Banting
Tim Banting

Summary Bullets:

  • Customers must clearly define what they need from a UC solution in terms of easy-to-articulate user personas. This will help them avoid overspending on end-user licensing and meeting the needs of the majority of the business.
  • Customers should also look towards defining attributes that have longevity such as reliability and simplicity. Superfluous features offer little value to end users, especially when they can be at the expense of easy administration and management.

Why has it taken so long for UC to become more focused on areas such as user experience and ease of use? The UC industry has grown into an unwieldy mix of features and functions stemming from vendor acquisitions with little thought towards meeting the needs of the customer. However, this is changing as vendors look to simplify and consolidate their portfolios, recognizing that complying with a long list of features is not the basis for a market-leading solution. Customer approaches to procuring technology have also changed. Companies are involving many areas of the business such as heads of departments, HR directors, and facilities managers, rather than allowing IT departments to make buying decisions in splendid isolation. The new CIO looks towards the strategic intent of platforms: the long-term, long-reaching visions for the business as a whole, inclusive of the things that users are going to need today and are going to need five years from now. Therefore, CIOs and IT departments should know the fundamental and persistent requirements of the business. Continue reading “Unified Communications: An Oxymoron That Finally Makes Sense”

CSC Explores the Leveraged Buyout Option

Amy Larsen DeCarlo
Amy Larsen DeCarlo

Summary Bullets:

  • CSC contacted a number of private equity firms in the first step toward evaluating whether a leveraged buyout that would allow the company to make further adjustments outside of the scrutiny of Wall Street would be a good option.
  • Though there are potential benefits associated with going private, even the exploration period can be risky as we all learned from Dell’s protracted 2013 leveraged buyout which put the company’s every flaw in the spotlight for months on end.

CSC has come a long way since the UK National Health Service (NHS) contract went off the rails and the shamed ITSP had to pay its client more than $1 billion for its botched job. Under the direction of current CSC President and CEO Mike Lawrie, the company implemented an extensive restructuring plan that includes some cost-cutting and some realignment of products. So when word hit the street that CSC was talking to private equity firms about a possible buyout, people took notice. After all, we are just a couple of years out from the point in time when industry watchers were speculating on whether CSC would sell itself to the highest bidder. Continue reading “CSC Explores the Leveraged Buyout Option”