Video Adds Value to UCaaS Integration into Business Processes

Cindy Whelan
Cindy Whelan

Summary Bullets:

  • Communications-enabling business processes optimizes individual and workgroup productivity, and adding visual communications takes this concept up a notch, moving past enterprise video calls to broader uses: if an alarm is triggered in a remote location, responders can gain visibility into the cause and severity of the problem; healthcare workers can monitor and talk to patients in rural areas; wireless cameras in emergency vehicles or worn by first responders give support staff an immediate view of a situation while the responder performs their duty.
  • Enterprises may not grasp the full potential benefit of integrating UCC features, including visual communications, into business processes and applications at the outset of a UCaaS deployment, but as user adoption grows, the benefits of this integration become apparent.

In early 2012, I wrote a blog post about the role of communication-enabled business process in the uptake of UC.  At that time, I’d noted that the opportunity to integrate communications features into specific business processes and applications potentially supported a more compelling business case for deployment; if a company started by integrating UCC features into just one business application or for one part of the organization, then they might start to see how this model could replicated in other areas of the company to improve productivity and communications, tipping the scales towards a broader implementation. Continue reading “Video Adds Value to UCaaS Integration into Business Processes”

The Event Stream Is Dead; Long Live Employee Engagement

Brad Shimmin
Brad Shimmin

Summary Bullets:

  • If this year’s E2 Conference is any indicator of things to come, the idea of a universal ‘Facebook for the Enterprise’ is dead.
  • Instead, industry leaders from the likes of SAP and IBM are touting a more engaged notion of transparency and context.

I always look forward to the Enterprise 2.0 Conference (or the E2 Conference, as it is now called), because it is one of the few general trade shows dedicated to the broader issue of enterprise collaboration.  It’s also housed within the great city of Boston, which is always a pleasure to visit.  Where else can you expect to find true rivals (Jive, SAP and IBM, for instance) openly discuss strategic issues such as the changing role of enterprise social networking?  During one such panel comprised of these same companies, IBM’s Alistair Rennie addressed the importance of mobility, saying that having a mobile client for this or that platform shouldn’t be the prime objective.  Rather, user engagement should be the top priority for vendors and customers alike. Continue reading “The Event Stream Is Dead; Long Live Employee Engagement”