Preparing for Dual Use (Corporate and Personal) Mobile Devices

A. Braunberg
A. Braunberg

Summary Bullets:

  • No silver bullets for mobile application controls
  • No single metric for success

Galen Gruman had an interesting article in InfoWorld last week, “Virtualization No Silver Bullet for Macs or Mobile” that got me thinking. While the article is actually chiefly about virtualization on non-Windows PCs/laptops it does make some important points about what is needed (and not needed) on mobile devices. To cut to the chase, what is needed is data/application partitioning. That is not news, of course, but the more interesting question that Gruman tackled is whether virtualization is the way to achieve partitioning of personal and corporate data and applications on mobile devices. He sees partitioning as one of the more compelling use cases for virtualization on mobile devices and I agree with that. But it is important to keep in mind that virtualization is just one of numerous techniques that are currently being developed to handle privacy, compliance and security concerns associated with dual-use devices. Continue reading “Preparing for Dual Use (Corporate and Personal) Mobile Devices”

The Race for Mobile Data Security

A. Braunberg
A. Braunberg

Summary Bullets:

  • Regardless of device, data protection is critical.
  • Current product/service choices are diverse to the point of being a bit daunting.

I have blogged a good bit lately about our recent mobility survey data.  One of the takeaways, as I have noted, is that enterprises are resigned to (and perhaps beginning to embrace) the consumerization of IT and the need to provide a degree of choice in mobile device support.  What this tends to mean is that Apple and Android smartphones and tablets are increasingly accessing resources from corporate networks.  However, while enterprise IT/security teams might have lost the battle, they still plan on winning the war; and the war has always really been about data protection. Continue reading “The Race for Mobile Data Security”

Data Center Fabrics: Enterprises Often Need a Networking Tailor

M. Spanbauer
M. Spanbauer

Summary Bullets:

  • Data center networking technologies are moving at a pace that few enterprises can keep up with
  • The networking provider of choice will impact cloud deployment plans and virtualization scale – so choose wisely

No one will argue that there have been more changes in networking coming out of the data center in the last 24 months than in the last ten years for the enterprise campus. This doesn’t demean the value of the campus, but rather highlights the standards and technology explosion inside the data center. Topics of debate and battlegrounds for vendor differentiation range from port speed and scale (1Gig to 100G) to protocol support and networking virtualization. Regardless, the standards remain in motion and a few standards in particular will have significant impact on the network architecture of choice for an enterprise. These include SPB & TRILL (competing standards to address spanning tree limitations), FCoE & DCB (storage over Ethernet and improvements to enhance iSCSI and existing storage over Ethernet), and of course virtualization insight and management of virtual switches. As several of these are not yet ratified, vendor support can only be gauged by stated intent (versus actually implemented).
Continue reading “Data Center Fabrics: Enterprises Often Need a Networking Tailor”

What’s Next for UC and Virtualization Software in Private Clouds

Brian Riggs
B. Riggs

Summary Bullets:

  • How UC software deployed in private clouds will change
  • What will change: Support for multiple hypervisors, a variety of server hardware, and advanced management features

Continuing on the topic of unified communications and virtualization from my previous IT Connections blog, UC solutions’ support for server virtualization is facilitating their deployment in private cloud environments. This has taken the form of Cisco, Siemens Enterprise, Mitel, and others adding support for VMware vSphere on their various UC and contact center platforms, while Avaya supports Citrix XenServer. This luxury of vendors being able to pick and choose which server virtualization platform they support is likely to be short-lived. Their widespread support for VMware vSphere is understandable. VMware commands a large share of the market, so choosing to support VMware means that a large number of enterprises will be able to deploy UC software in data centers. However, VMware is not the only game in town and not all enterprises have standardized on it. As a result, developers of UC solutions will soon need to support other hypervisors as well. Microsoft is ahead in this particular game. When Lync was launched early this year, it included support not only for Microsoft’s Hyper-V hypervisor, but also for VMware and Citrix hypervisors.
Continue reading “What’s Next for UC and Virtualization Software in Private Clouds”