All in it Together: Enterprises Join Threat Intelligence Alliances to Combat Security Risk

John Marcus

John Marcus

Summary Bullets:

  • Crowdsourcing in cybersecurity is not new, but it is gaining significant traction with heavyweight sponsors
  • Enterprises can benefit from participating, with the potential value outweighing any perceived costs

It’s impossible for any one organization to keep up with every current security threat on its own. That’s why enterprises use tools and managed services from security vendors in the first place, right? But even those specialists who have invested millions in real-time security intelligence and analytics platforms–and/or armies of security analysts—can’t know or predict everything. That’s why numerous initiatives have been started to pool threat monitoring resources together in a cooperative fashion and on a large scale, using crowdsourcing techniques to protect the community as a whole.

On May 14th, IBM announced that more than 1,000 organizations across 16 industries are participating in its X-Force Exchange threat intelligence network, just one month after its launch. IBM X-Force Exchange provides open access to historical and real-time data feeds of threat intelligence, including reports of live attacks from IBM’s global threat monitoring network, to help enterprises defend against cybercrime. The company provided free access to its 700 terabyte threat database, including two decades of malicious cyberattack data from IBM, as well as anonymous threat data from thousands of its managed security clients. It already supports an average of 1,000 data queries from participating organizations each day. Read more of this post

Get Ready for Cloud-borne BI That’s Both Scalable and Free, Mostly

Brad Shimmin

Brad Shimmin

Summary Bullets:

  • Though traditional business intelligence (BI) players have been slow to adopt the cloud, they are moving in that direction with alacrity, targeting both departmental buyers and CxO decision makers.
  • BI solutions are beginning to combine a freemium data discovery and visualization user experience with pay-as-you-go data storage and processing, all delivered via the cloud.

The cloud reminds me of the sea. Not in the sense that it smells of brine and brims with mystery at what lies beneath those soothing waves, but rather in how the sea evolved into an economic engine, driving society forward through powerful but invisible trade routes. Like the sea, the cloud has evolved to carry commerce at scale. This is especially true with enterprise data and analytics. Only instead of mega-vessels carrying staggeringly massive numbers of shipping containers (think 18,500 of them on the Maersk Triple E class of ships), we have cloud platform providers like Microsoft, Google, and Amazon building mega-scale data repositories capable of storing, processing and carrying petabytes of information. Read more of this post

Preparing for Life Beyond Patch Tuesday with Windows Update for Business

Summary bullets:

• Microsoft’s Windows Update for Business will provide software updates for Windows 10 enterprise, end-user devices in a more fluid, flexible manner.

• Patch Tuesday isn’t ending tomorrow, but vulnerability management vendors should begin preparing now for Windows Update for Business, particularly in regard to system classification, distribution and auditing.

Microsoft last week introduced Windows Update for Business, a new software-update mechanism for its upcoming Windows 10 operating system.

With Windows Update for Business, Microsoft hopes to provide software updates for Windows 10 enterprise, end-user devices in a more fluid, flexible manner. Key features include distribution rings that will offer more flexibility regarding when and how quickly software updates are deployed. This includes maintenance windows to better align update distribution with mission-critical uptime requirements as well as other planned maintenance and configuration periods; peer-to-peer delivery to reduce bandwidth utilization at branch offices and remote sites; and integration with existing tools like System Center and Windows Server Update Services.

Despite the media hype that Windows Update for Business will end Patch Tuesday as we know it, this is far from the case. Read more of this post

Networking Came to a Fork in the Road

Mike Fratto

Mike Fratto

Summary Bullets:

  • Dell is leading the competitive market in disaggregated switching with four switches and three (soon to be four) OSs supported.
  • Any networking vendor could equal Dell’s early lead in a few months, but catching up with Dell’s integration strategies will take longer.

While Cisco and VMware are squabbling over ACI and NSX and other networking vendors are trying to gain mind and market share with enterprise IT, Dell has taken a turn away from all of its competitors by committing its future data center switch lines to its ‘open networking’ (ON) strategy that may very well be a significant differentiator in the future. Read more of this post

Can Operators Monetize MEAP/MADP? Changes in the EMM Landscape Suggest Unresolved Issues

Kathryn Weldon

Kathryn Weldon

Summary Bullets:

  • Three years ago MEAP/MADP services were a standard part of Tier 1 operators’ enterprise mobility offerings
  • Many report problems monetizing MEAPs, while others have disbanded them altogether

Current Analysis recently updated our bi-annual profiles of the global managed mobility services offered by U.S. and European operators. While burgeoning use of mobile applications in the business segment is a hot topic, it is not clear that the operators are faring that well as the providers of these applications, in spite of initiatives announced years ago to enable application development and back-end integration through mobile enterprise application platforms. The term “MEAP” is not used very widely any more in the application platform provider community, discarded in favor of mobile application development platforms (MADP); more importantly the market has evolved as cloud-enablement has spurred on “as a service” offers provided directly to enterprises rather than resold through the carrier channel. Mobile back-end as a service (MBaaS) from companies such as Kony and FeedHenry, and platform as a service (PaaS) offerings such as Microsoft Azure, IBM Bluemix, Pivotal Cloud Foundry, Red Hat OpenShift, and VMware vCloud Air are being adopted directly by businesses to allow them to develop business applications, to readily provide mobile access to these apps via the cloud or build native mobile B2B/B2C apps that may reside on the mobile device. Cloud-based app platforms are also leveraged by ITSPs such as IBM, Accenture, CSC, and HP to develop mobile apps for their business customers. PaaS provides opportunities for the ITSPs looking to support the infrastructure enterprises need to support agile and rapid mobile app development. At the same time pre-built mobile applications by companies such as SAP, and IBM together with Apple, are saving time and effort for operators, ITSPs and other channel partners, and enterprises themselves. Read more of this post