Jive’s WorkHub: Why a Social Collaboration Platform Is Different from an App

T. Banting

T. Banting

Summary Bullets:

  • Jive’s WorkHub branding aligns well with the vendor’s strategy to allow businesses to connect, communicate and collaborate based on their unique needs and personal workstyle.
  • There needs to be a distinction drawn in the market between the pervasive and integrative nature of social collaboration platforms and lightweight enterprise team applications such as Slack.

Recently, Jive announced its WorkHub branding alongside new packaged solutions (Jive for Healthcare Collaboration, Jive for Employee Engagement and Jive for Customer Engagement) designed for vertical markets and use cases. Jive Software was, I believe, one of the first vendors to introduce us to the concept of hubs and the social intranet being central to collaboration within an organization. A successful social collaboration platform supports all areas of the business and all employees; however, Jive Software’s focus on new line-of-business segments (e.g., HR and marketing) is likely to cut through some of the broader and more historical concerns associated with adoption (e.g., behavioral change, cultural fit and changes to working practices) and clearly aims to provide specific solutions to broken business processes. Consequently, this is likely to accelerate Jive’s marketplace momentum and (once an initial use-case is secured) establish a beachhead for wider employee adoption. Read more of this post

TEM Services are Evolving in Both Predictable and Unpredictable Directions

K. Weldon

K. Weldon

Summary Bullets:

• TEM Services have been useful for enterprises to track usage and mobile service expenditures, reconcile invoices across carriers, and optimize service plans

• The latest crop of TEM services encompass fixed and mobile, IT expenses, unified communications usage analytics, and usage and expense management for market data by investment firms

A recent set of Current Analysis company reports analyzing telecom expense management (TEM) services by independent providers such as Asentinel, Tangoe, Ezwim, Calero and MDSL show a fascinating evolution. These companies used to offer software that aggregated expenses from multiple mobile operators used by their business customers, and performed invoice reconciliation together with outsourced dispute management and service plan optimization. Looking at these companies’ latest sets of services, it is clear that their portfolios have changed considerably. For example:

• Predictably, TEM providers now offer their platforms as SaaS, which they tend to call lifecycle management services

• Not only do TEM providers analyze both fixed and mobile service usage and expenditures; most providers now offer IT expense management, looking at items such as data center/hosting charges and cloud services. Read more of this post

Why Design Thinking is Important to Collaboration

B. Page

B. Page

Summary Bullets:

• IBM’s Connect 2016 conference highlights industrial design and user experience (UX) excellence as differentiators in its Collaboration portfolio

• UX is important across all types of IT products and services, but is especially relevant to achieving success in enterprise collaboration initiatives

“’Easy to Use’ is easy to say,” as generations of programmers have heard and then learned – often the hard way. Read more of this post

Why Is IBM So Averse to Screaming About Verse and Other Innovations?

T. Banting

T. Banting

Summary Bullets:

  • IBM has changed itself around from a product-focused company to one which is more asset-led through the application of its ‘design thinking’ approach.
  • However, IBM must ensure its differentiation gets heard above established and emerging competitors in the collaboration and communications marketplace.

Last week’s IBM Connect 2016 (IBM’s annual collaboration conference) was somewhat of a revelation for me. What stood out for me was how IBM has changed itself from a company that was more product-focused to one which is more asset-led. Asset-led companies tend to make decisions based on the needs of the user and the assets of the solution. The perfect situation is, of course, for a business to relate customer needs to the business’s own strengths. This, then, is where IBM’s design thinking approach to solution development is key to success. Read more of this post

IBM’s UX Handholding Drives Business to Digital Marketing Cloud Portfolio

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

• IBM’s three design acquisitions in one week strengthen its marketing cloud clout

• IBM will glean knowledge through partnership with Adobe Marketing Cloud

Do you know how many calorie-counting apps are out there? A lot. But I’ve never cared for most of them until I came across MyFitnessPal, which is a quick set-up, helps me track daily calories, and includes slick graphics like pie charts to make sure I’m taking in the correct ratio of calories between carbs, fats, and proteins. Read more of this post

Whither Cognitive Collaboration? IBM’s Embarrassment of Riches

B. Shimmin

B. Shimmin

Summary Bullets:

  • IBM hopes to move beyond its legacy Notes/Domino customer base and establish a forward-looking customer base through the liberal application of IBM Watson analytics capabilities across its entire collaborative portfolio.
  • However, IBM must move carefully and quickly lest it squander this unique and sizable opportunity.

This week saw IBM’s annual collaboration conference (IBM Connect 2016) break from a longstanding tradition and move to a new venue. On the surface, this may not seem like much. Companies always shop around for the best venue. But, this is a big deal for IBM, which had heretofore held its collaboration conference (which you may recognize by its former name, Lotusphere) at the Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin hotel for more than 20 consecutive years. That’s an awful lot of stability. Maybe too much stability. Read more of this post

Fixed Wireless Access Finds Success, but Perception Challenges Remain

B. Washburn

B. Washburn

Summary Bullets:

• Cellular wireless services continue to find traction for flexible, value-priced temporary and failover connectivity, as long as the enterprise is comfortable using best-effort broadband.

• Fixed wireless specialists offer a flexible range of microwave access connectivity when wireline options are inadequate or not available, but buyers still frequently lean toward wired.

In the U.S., fixed wireless services have gone through several boom-and-bust publicity cycles. But behind the publicity, wireless technologies are sound and in most cases, delivering on promises. AT&T, Verizon and Sprint don’t disclose the numbers of businesses that have purchased CPE with their respective managed 4G/3G fixed wireless failover services. But the widespread resale of cellular failover services by other providers shows the service option has solid traction. Cost and availability have something to do with that. When a wireless failover service can cost as little as $10-$20 per month as long as it’s idle, that’s a cheap insurance policy. It also helps that 4G networks are now nationwide, and offer better throughput and performance than 3G wireless. But cellular wireless is still best-effort broadband, and not an option for failing over traffic that must have sustained throughput or guaranteed performance.

Read more of this post

MWC16 May Reveal that IoT Will Upset the Industry’s Balance of Power

Summary Bullets:

• The sharing economy plus IoT is changing the balance of power between telcos and their suppliers

• CSPs may be powerless to stop themselves from being marginalized.

There are two big questions hanging over Mobile World Congress 2016, which opens in Barcelona in a couple of weeks. The first is about who will win the scramble for account control in the Internet of Things. The second is about the industry’s balance of power as firms test the limits of the rented/shared asset ownership model.
Read more of this post

Is It a Bird? Is It a Plane? No, It’s a Google/SpaceX Satellite!

J. Stradling

J. Stradling

Summary Bullets:

  • Satellite technology advancements, including steerable beams as well as new middle Earth orbit (MEO) and low Earth orbit (LEO) constellations, can potentially benefit businesses with cost-effective, low-latency, high-speed connectivity.
  • Satellite innovation can open new enterprise-grade applications leveraging lower costs and higher performance, such as deploying satellite backup in case of terrestrial network outage and expanding target markets for cloud computing services.

Robust connectivity to the Internet worldwide remains elusive despite the aggressive efforts of pioneers such as Google and investment partner Fidelity. There are vast expanses of land and sea where the choice is between high-latency (up to one second per hop) GEO satellites, or lower-latency but very narrowband LEO or MEO constellations such as Orbcomm, Globalstar or Iridium. Read more of this post

Axway’s Acquisition of Appcelerator Increases Its Mobile Value Proposition

C. Dunlap

C. Dunlap

Summary Bullets:

  • Appcelerator’s MADP offering will enhance Axway’s API services.
  • Appcelerator has struggled with a questionable business model that drastically changed a year ago.

Little-known Axway has purchased one of the leading MADP pure plays, Appcelerator, to enhance Axway’s API service offering with mobile technology and improve its competitive threat as it goes after enterprises launching mobile projects. Read more of this post

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